web developer & internet junkie. F5 with me
194 stories
·
1 follower

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Right

1 Comment and 8 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
We are entering a golden age where we constantly surveil each other but are scared to wave from across a fence.


Today's News:
Read the whole story
p4ul
88 days ago
reply
Wellington, New Zealand
popular
92 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
jlvanderzwan
93 days ago
reply


IIRC paranoia is about imagining things that are not really happening. So I guess this would not be paranoia but anxiety.

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Diet

12 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
In all likelihood, you are already on this diet. Congrats on sticking to it!

New comic!
Today's News:
Read the whole story
p4ul
203 days ago
reply
Wellington, New Zealand
popular
205 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - A Vicious Cycle

1 Comment and 10 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
I'm not sure why, but I find the idea that the bicycle has a switchblade to be comedy gold.

New comic!
Today's News:
Read the whole story
p4ul
301 days ago
reply
Wellington, New Zealand
popular
304 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
francisga
305 days ago
reply
The cycle of violence
Lafayette, LA, USA

The Digital Twin

1 Share

People are slowly moving on from thinking about the Internet of Things (IoT) in terms of a new way of describing machine-to-machine connectivity. As with all step-changes, new technologies are first contextualised within the existing frames of reference. Over time, the new technology enables a new wave of possibilities, which were previously impossible or hard. In turn, this creates new frames of reference.

The Digital Twin concept is one of those new possibilities enabled by IoT.

In our About page, we talk about the potential of  IoT to “transform physical industries- such as agriculture and infrastructure- by creating a digital representation capable of being sensed, analysed and controlled.” The Digital Twin concept is one way of giving structure to that digital representation.

Following Gartner’s including it in the list of Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017, there has been increased interest in the concept. Articles such as Forbes’ What Is Digital Twin Technology – And Why Is It So Important? brings it into mainstream business focus.

Definition of Digital Twin

That depends on who you ask.

One thing the Digital Twin isn’t is what the name implies. The Digital Twin is a digital representation, or many of them, rather than an exact replica of the physical object or system. It also isn’t a simulation though it can be used to generate simulations.

Personally, I like Gartner’s one for being short- “a dynamic software model of a physical thing or system.” Gartner goes on to say, “It includes the model of the physical object, data from the object, a unique one-to-one correspondence to the object and the ability to monitor the object.”

Importantly, the Digital Twin can be at different levels, such as component, product, or system. A Digital Twin can be composed of lower level Digital Twins. For example, a supply chain system or factory or smart city composed of Digital Twins of sub-systems and components.

A critical aspect of the Digital Twin is the use of various AI techniques that learns over time from multiple sources. This works together with other representations, be they statistical, finite element, physics-based, etc.

Perhaps the definition is less important than the business value Digital Twins can provide. In any case, the concept is platform dependent at this stage so it is whatever a GE or IBM or the particular vendor says it is.

A newer twist is the Cognitive Digital Twin concept that adds intelligence to the data and information of typical Digital Twins.

Uses of Digital Twins

There are several examples where the Digital Twin concept is delivering tangible benefits with the IoT angle being the generation of real-time data from physical things and systems.

Broadly, Digital Twins can provide historical data, present data, and future insights. Typically they cover the whole lifecycle, from design to production to operation to end of life. By influencing the design of the next generation of the represented product or system, they can even be thought to “evolve”. For example, NASA develops the next generation of space vehicles virtually based on the Digital Twins of previous ones before physically manufacturing it.

Some questions that a Digital Twin can answer include:

1. What happens to the roads in Wellington when a big earthquake takes out SH1?

2. How much stress to the wind turbine, and to which elements, is the current storm generating?

3. Can a particular critical component wait to be replaced and for how long?

4. Which design improves efficiency most?

5. What’s the best way to change a particular part on a machine?

6. How does customer experience change with a particular product or service modification?

 

To know more, I suggest listening to the series of podcasts (episodes 84 to 89) from Bruce Sinclair specifically looking at Digital Twins.

Read the whole story
p4ul
380 days ago
reply
Wellington, New Zealand
Share this story
Delete

millennialsargueback: poutine-existentielle: nightworldlove: guiltyfandoms: thattallnerdybean: d...

3 Comments and 17 Shares

millennialsargueback:

poutine-existentielle:

nightworldlove:

guiltyfandoms:

thattallnerdybean:

dvadad:

cashier: sorry for your wait. we’re short-staffed today

millennial: oh that’s ok no worries :)

 baby boomer:

But listen that’s the thing. 

We are short staffed almost 97% of the time at my retail job. Because corporate has figured out you can overwork 4 people at minimum wage instead of paying for the 8 people you should probably have to be on the clock.  

Baby boomers grew up with stores that were adequately staffed, with workers who most likely had weeks of training for their jobs as opposed to the 1-2 shadow shift training we get now. Also those workers most likely were able to be full time if they wanted. Now retail, except for management positions, is mostly made up of part time workers, because you don’t have to give them benefits. So you have a workforce of perpetually underpaid, overwhelmed, undertrained people trying to do their best all while dealing with an entire generation of people who refuse to acknowledge that the system has changed and the average retail worker has NO control over that change and is being taken advantage of.

Like we got our customer surveys back, and almost every single one mentioned that they couldn’t find someone to help them or we needed more people on register because it was TOO SLOW, but what did management tell us instead of scheduling more people? We need to be quicker on register and call for backup if necessary. Which makes no sense because we can’t call for backup THAT ISN’T THERE.

Y'all my parents haven’t worked retail since the 70s and they absolutely never believe me about the things that happen at work. I explain the schedule for next week gets hung up on the Friday before and they scoff and go “well when i worked at X they had it a month up your manager is just lazy.” No mom, its company policy to only do “two weeks” in advance. They won’t give you a full month’s scheduling in advance cause it let’s you plan for a world outside of work.

Or about the hours, workload or anything. They just assume its an individual’s failing instead of corporate mandate. Or, if they do believe me (that its company policy) they call it ridiculous and point out some survey that argues its Good Business to do (insert decent thing here).As if they think the higher ups don’t know this and are simply ignorant of Good Business Practices. They don’t understand that retail has completely shifted from caring about its employees to squeezing out every penny now instead of investing it for later.

Cause that isn’t how it was when they worked and they just can’t seem to see otherwise.

   I think there should be a ‘bring-your-parent-to-work-day’ instead of ‘bring-your-kid-to-work-day’, it would shock so many parents and would probably make them finally realize how much retail indeed has changed in the US.

when i first got hired as a cashier, my manager who had been doing that since she was like 17 in 1975 told me that back in The Days, when you were hired as a cashier in a grocery store it was a) a well paid job & you could get full time work easily b) a respected career choice c) the store closed at 6pm and was closed on Sundays so the hours were a lot more pleasant d) they made you go to cashier school for 2 weeks, which was basically a fake grocery store and you just learned the trade completely before even meeting a customer
now its like : you get like 20 hours a week, bullshit shifts like 3:45 to 10:15, a 20 minutes training before being thrown to the wolves, customers tell you you deserve your shitty lowlife job as soon as you don’t thoroughly kiss their ass

The millennial experience is tied to growing income inequality and the indentured servitude of student loan debt

Read the whole story
p4ul
442 days ago
reply
Wellington, New Zealand
popular
443 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
rtreborb
442 days ago
reply
It's really interesting to think about the generational expectations when it comes to retail jobs
jhamill
443 days ago
reply
Baby Boomers continue to be blind to the bullshit world they created.
California

Michael Lewis and the parable of the lucky man taking the extra cookie

3 Comments and 16 Shares

In 2012, Michael Lewis gave a commencement speech at Princeton University, his alma mater. In the speech, Lewis, the author of Liar’s Poker, Moneyball, and The Big Short, talks about the role of luck in rationalizing success. He tells the graduates, the winners of so many of life’s lotteries, that they “owe a debt to the unlucky”. This part near the end is worth reading even if you skip the rest of it.

I now live in Berkeley, California. A few years ago, just a few blocks from my home, a pair of researchers in the Cal psychology department staged an experiment. They began by grabbing students, as lab rats. Then they broke the students into teams, segregated by sex. Three men, or three women, per team. Then they put these teams of three into a room, and arbitrarily assigned one of the three to act as leader. Then they gave them some complicated moral problem to solve: say what should be done about academic cheating, or how to regulate drinking on campus.

Exactly 30 minutes into the problem-solving the researchers interrupted each group. They entered the room bearing a plate of cookies. Four cookies. The team consisted of three people, but there were these four cookies. Every team member obviously got one cookie, but that left a fourth cookie, just sitting there. It should have been awkward. But it wasn’t. With incredible consistency the person arbitrarily appointed leader of the group grabbed the fourth cookie, and ate it. Not only ate it, but ate it with gusto: lips smacking, mouth open, drool at the corners of their mouths. In the end all that was left of the extra cookie were crumbs on the leader’s shirt.

This leader had performed no special task. He had no special virtue. He’d been chosen at random, 30 minutes earlier. His status was nothing but luck. But it still left him with the sense that the cookie should be his.

This experiment helps to explain Wall Street bonuses and CEO pay, and I’m sure lots of other human behavior. But it also is relevant to new graduates of Princeton University. In a general sort of way you have been appointed the leader of the group. Your appointment may not be entirely arbitrary. But you must sense its arbitrary aspect: you are the lucky few. Lucky in your parents, lucky in your country, lucky that a place like Princeton exists that can take in lucky people, introduce them to other lucky people, and increase their chances of becoming even luckier. Lucky that you live in the richest society the world has ever seen, in a time when no one actually expects you to sacrifice your interests to anything.

All of you have been faced with the extra cookie. All of you will be faced with many more of them. In time you will find it easy to assume that you deserve the extra cookie. For all I know, you may. But you’ll be happier, and the world will be better off, if you at least pretend that you don’t.

You can watch Lewis’ speech as delivered on YouTube:

I wonder if hearing that moved the needle for any of those grads? I suspect not…being born on third base thinking you hit a triple is as American as apple pie at this point. (via @goldman)

Tags: commencement speeches   Michael Lewis   Princeton   video
Read the whole story
p4ul
457 days ago
reply
Wellington, New Zealand
popular
468 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
3 public comments
kleer001
468 days ago
reply
Excellent! Don't forget to help your lucky friends come to the same realization.
dmierkin
468 days ago
reply
well put
jheiss
470 days ago
reply
Well, as someone who was "born on third base" and is making decent progress on scoring a run (to keep up the analogy), I can tell you that there's at least one of us out here who is damn well aware that luck has played a significant part and does at least try to pretend that he doesn't deserve the cookie.
Next Page of Stories